Hypnosis To Quit Smoking

by Bob Walsh

Here’s a great story by a woman I met at an hypnosis event. She went to a hypnotist to stop smoking – even though she was scared and worried about the common “hypnosis myths”. Did it work for her? Did she really stop smoking? Find out for yourself…

Even though the science of hypnosis has been around for many years, it is still very much a taboo subject. The primary reason for this is that few people understand what hypnosis actually is.

The first time I went to see a hypnotist (to give up smoking in fact), I too was a little nervous. I remember how sweaty my palms were as I waited in the reception room for the hypnotist to see me.

I must admit I was a little disappointed when I was eventually called into the consultation room: I had been expecting an old man, bent-double with small round spectacles perched on the end of his nose. What I got was a tall distinguished looking man who looked more like a lawyer than a ‘quack’.

He explained to me that all hypnosis is self-hypnosis. The hypnotist is just the facilitator.

The process of hypnosis, rather than being something imposed upon you, is in fact a self-induced relaxation. The golden rule, he told me, was that I would remain in control of myself at all times.

If I was ever uncomfortable, or I simply wanted the session to end, he assured me that I would be able to get up and leave of my own accord. In fact, he even told me that I would probably not realize that I had been hypnotized because the state which he was going to induce was such a normal state for me that I would not be able to distinguish it from a simple day dream.As he was talking, my eyes closed.

I felt a sudden wave of relaxation pass through my entire body. I remember thinking how relaxed I felt and how enjoyable the experience was. I completely opened up to him, answering all of his questions straightforwardly and honestly. The most surprising thing of all was the way that the time flew.

Unless he had got up and adjusted my wrist watch during the induction (which he didn’t), I would have sworn that one hour passed in the space of 5 minutes. And so… The question which you are dying to know the answer to: Did it work?

Did I ever smoke again?

The truth is that I did smoke again, but it was many years later. For a full five years from leaving that consultation room I never smoked a single cigarette. Not only that, I never even felt any cravings for one.

Quite simply, I felt free. It was great, thinking about it, the moment I have finished writing this, I had better get back on the phone and book myself another session… Even if it doesn’t work, it is the most relaxing experience I have ever had.

I recommend hypnosis to anyone (although of course you should always take your own advice on such matters). Even if you don’t smoke or have any psychological afflictions, it is worth it for the feeling that you get when you leave.

I don’t know what he whispered in my ear for that hour, but I left that room feeling 10 feet tall, with a smile from ear to ear. I am no longer afraid of hypnosis, and neither should you be!

Click Here Get Your Stop Smoking Hypnosis MP3

{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Indira Appalnaidu February 26, 2013 at 6:01 pm

Is there any ‘physical’ change to the body, when a smoker merely ‘thinks’ of a cigarette

Bob Walsh February 27, 2013 at 6:53 am

Dear Indira,
that’s an interesting question – and yes, indeed, there are physical changes to the body when a smoker things of a cigarette. In fact, every thought you think creates physical changes to your body at some level, but I suppose your question is not regarding that – every thought creates physical changes in your brain, in the interaction of your neurons.
So if we look at the changes that happen in your body when you as a smoker think of a cigarette, let’s start even a bit earlier: the moments prior to you thinking of a cigarette.
British researchers discovered that your body sends stress signals to you when a nicotine craving kicks in. So as a smoker, you start to feel stressed because of a nicotine craving (higher amounts of adrenaline get released into your body, muscles tense up, breathing becomes faster and more flat, etc.) – and then you start to think of a cigarette for stress relief. Once you actually think of a cigarette, the stress reaction increases even more. Paradoxically, smokers tend to think that smoking relaxes them, while the opposite is actually the case – the smoking causes additional stress because of the nicotine cravings, and when the body gets nicotine, the additional stress gets reduced. So smoking isn’t really relaxing – it’s just something that helps to undo the stress the nicotine cravings caused.
Kind regards,
Bob

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