Nocebo, Placebo & Hypnosis

by Bob Walsh

In the current New Yorker there’s an interesting article about the Nocebo effect. In case you haven’t heard about this yet – it’s the opposite of the Placebo effect.

The nocebo effect is when something that you imagine or belief causes you to develop negative symptoms or even become sick.

Click here >>> Placebo Effect Hypnosis Download

An example of that is people who believe that radio waves harm them, and actually worry themselves sick about it.

And yes, there’s a fancy medical term for that too:

idiopathic environmental intolerance attributed to electromagnetic fields.

In clinical drug trials, people often report the side effects they were warned about, even if they are taking a placebo. In research on fibromyalgia treatments, eleven per cent of the people taking the equivalent of sugar pills experienced such debilitating side effects that they dropped out.

Then the author talks about some interesting research by a German scientist on this subject, but later he makes a really important point:

“Placebo” has come to mean fake, but, as Michael Specter explained in a feature last year, that’s not quite right. The effects are real—so real, in fact that some scientists argue that doctors should receive more training in using placebos, and make them a regular part of their practice. Patients given placebos experience biochemical changes that improve their condition. Placebo painkillers activate the body’s natural analgesics. Parkinson’s placebos prompt the brain to release dopamine; anxiety and depression placebos elicit changes in the areas of the brain that regulate emotion. One particularly remarkable study recruited patients with irritable-bowel syndrome and told them that their treatment would be “pills made of an inert substance, like sugar pills, that have been shown in clinical studies to produce significant improvement in I.B.S. symptoms through mind-body self-healing processes.” Even though the treatment was a placebo, and even though the patients knew it was a placebo, they showed significant improvement.

This is something I’ve been arguing for a long time already. I also think doctors should receive training in hypnotic language patterns so that they can use their interactions with patients to support the healing process.

Fortunately you can also do something yourself to make use of the placebo effect.

As crazy as this might sound: you can actually train your mind to benefit from the placebo effect using a simple self hypnosis download for the placebo effect.